News: Lung Cancer

Next Page »« Previous Page

Lung Cancer Screening Trial Helps First Patient

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Kathy Leiser first heard about Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center’s lung cancer screening trial through a sponsorship ad on WPLN radio last summer. The Nashville office technology saleswoman and grandmother of three had stopped smoking in 2009, but she knew her smoking history put her at risk for lung cancer. So she enrolled in the screening trial, […]

Surgical Teamwork Boosts Patient’s Odds

Friday, February 24th, 2012

The first surgery Eric Grogan, M.D., and Matthew McGirt, M.D., performed together lasted 18 hours. Grogan, a thoracic surgeon, carefully cut away the baseball-sized lung tumor that had wrapped around patient Ronald Denton’s aorta, subclavian artery and esophagus and removed the upper lobe of the lung. After they worked together to remove three vertebrae that […]

Town Hall: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Monday, February 20th, 2012

We hope you will join us for a town hall meeting about non-small cell lung cancer on March 7 at 6:30 p.m. at the Millenium Maxwell House Hotel on Rosa Parks Blvd. This activity is intended for oncologists, pathologists, pulmonologists, and other clinicians involved in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The forum […]

Drugs Reverse Lung Cancer Cell Changes

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

The protein transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) can act as either a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter depending on the stage of cancer. Loss of TGF-β’s tumor suppressor activity may play an important role in lung cancer progression. Pran Datta, Ph.D., and colleagues previously showed that this loss of responsiveness to TGF-β occurs mainly […]

Pulmonary Rehabilitation

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

As part of the Vanderbilt Cancer Wellness Program, Zachary Klint, Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Coordinator, explains why pulmonary rehabilitation is helpful for those going through lung cancer treatments as well as heart conditions. The program teaches you about your lungs, how to exercise and do activities without becoming short of breath. Learn more about the […]

Lymphedema Therapy

Monday, December 19th, 2011

Jadranko “Yadi” Franjic describes lymphedema symptoms and what is done during therapy to help control the swelling in the lymphatic system. Lymphedema is most common among patients who experience trauma to their lymphatic system. Examples include cancer patients undergoing lymphatic node dissection or radiation therapy and those who suffer a traumatic injury. Swelling of the […]

Using Nutrition to Battle Cancer

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

Many times those going through cancer treatment and even those who have finished have questions about eating a healthy diet. Melissa Brown, a nutrition coach at the Vanderbilt Center for Integrative Health, describes different foods that have cancer-fighting agents in them as well as easy meal techniques. If you are interested in learning more about […]

RENEW: Gentle Movement Classes

Monday, December 12th, 2011

The RENEW: Gentle Movement Classes are part of the Vanderbilt Cancer Wellness Program and are for adults going through cancer treatment as well as those who have finished. Karen Dyer-Klein, an exercise specialist at the Vanderbilt Dayani Center, describes the types of workouts available, which include Ai Chi (aquatic exercise) on Mondays at 3:15 p.m., […]

My Health Chat to Focus on Cancer

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

For decades, cancers have been treated based on how they look under a microscope. Now, researchers know that specific abnormalities in the DNA of tumor cells can make each person’s cancer respond differently to treatment — knowledge that offers an exciting new avenue for tailored therapy. Personalizing cancer treatment for an individual patient based on […]

Lung Resections Not Always “Futile”

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

The gold standard for definitive diagnosis of a lung nodule is surgical removal (resection). However, between 10 percent and 30 percent of suspicious nodules are benign. Because thoracic operations are highly invasive and pose significant risks, these operations have been labeled “unnecessary” or “futile.” Eric Grogan, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues report that, even when surgical […]