News: brain tumor

New Method May Allow Personalized Clinical Trial for Cancer Therapies

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

A new tool to observe cell behavior has revealed surprising clues about how cancer cells respond to therapy – and may offer a way to further refine personalized cancer treatments. The approach, developed by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, shows that erlotinib – a targeted therapy that acts on a growth factor receptor mutated in […]

Study Links Rare Genetic Marker to Brain Cancer

Friday, August 10th, 2012

Glioma is the most common and lethal type of brain tumor, and now investigators from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and three other cancer centers have identified a link between a rare genetic variant and the risk of developing glioma. The variant also appears to improve the odds of survival among glioma patients. Reid Thompson, M.D., William […]

Network Approach Yields Glioblastoma Clues

Friday, August 10th, 2012

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in cellular development, differentiation and cancer growth by regulating gene expression. They may be clinically useful as biomarkers and as targets for new drugs to treat such cancers as glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in humans. But first scientists must understand better how the actions […]

Weaver Honored by Neuro Association

Friday, June 10th, 2011

Kyle Weaver, M.D., assistant professor of Neurological Surgery, has received the Preuss Award from the Joint Section on Tumors of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS). The Preuss Award is given to a young scientist investigating brain tumors who submitted the best basic science research paper. First […]

Latest Focused ‘Radiosugery’ Technology Featured in New Video

Sunday, February 7th, 2010

The Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center has recently opened a new suite for “stereotactic radiosurgery,” which uses the latest generation in radiation therapy technology.

Drs. Fen Xia and Anthony Cmelak observe as a patient is positioned for stereotactic radiosurgery for her tumor. This system, called Novalis TX, offers precision to the millimeter — about the width of a fingernail.