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Virus-linked Cancer Gets Help from Host

Friday, December 16th, 2011

Although viruses like HPV (human papilloma virus) are involved in a considerable number of cancers, it takes more than the viral infection for cancer to develop. Host proteins also play important roles. Mary Zutter, M.D., and colleagues are exploring the role of integrins – proteins that help cells attach to each other – in cancer […]

Lung Resections Not Always “Futile”

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

The gold standard for definitive diagnosis of a lung nodule is surgical removal (resection). However, between 10 percent and 30 percent of suspicious nodules are benign. Because thoracic operations are highly invasive and pose significant risks, these operations have been labeled “unnecessary” or “futile.” Eric Grogan, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues report that, even when surgical […]

Pathway to Colon Cancer Progression

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

Identifying the molecular pathways that lead normal colon cells to become cancer cell could provide much needed biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Previously, Punita Dhawan, Ph.D., and colleagues showed that claudin-1 – a protein member of “tight junctions” that help bind cells together into an organized tissue structure – was greatly increased and mislocalized in colorectal […]

FERM Target for Rare Leukemia

Friday, November 18th, 2011

Most patients diagnosed with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) – a rare, aggressive blood cancer – will die within a year of diagnosis. No currently available treatments alter the disease’s aggressive clinical course. Utpal Davé, M.D., and colleagues are working to identify genes and pathways that drive or initiate ATLL. In the Oct. 6 issue of […]

Averting a Future Oncologist Shortage

Friday, November 4th, 2011

With an anticipated shortage of up to 4000 oncologists by 2020, retaining hematologists and oncologists in academic medicine is increasingly important. Because of the critical role of academic faculty in driving research and innovation, as well as in training and mentoring future oncologists, a decline in academic hematologists and oncologists could exacerbate the already anticipated […]

ASCB Honors Wente

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Susan Wente, Ph.D., associate vice chancellor for Research and professor of Cell & Developmental Biology, is the recipient of the 2011 Women in Cell Biology Senior Career Recognition Award from the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB). The award is given to senior researchers “whose outstanding scientific achievements are coupled with a long-standing record of […]

Protein Family Linked to Suppressing Tumors

Friday, October 28th, 2011

The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The new study, published Oct. 17 in Cancer Cell, identifies the protein SIRT2 as a tumor suppressor linked to gender-specific tumor development in mice. Along […]

New Views of Inflammation, Cancer

Friday, October 21st, 2011

The enzyme COX-2 – normally expressed at low levels – increases at sites of inflammation and in pre-malignant and malignant tumors, making it an attractive target for molecular imaging to diagnose and treat cancer. Jashim Uddin, Ph.D., Lawrence Marnett, Ph.D., and colleagues are developing novel imaging agents that selectively bind to COX-2. In work featured […]

Fungus Toxin Gets in the Way in DNA

Friday, October 7th, 2011

Aflatoxins – carcinogenic toxins produced by fungi – contaminate food. Aflatoxin B1 has been implicated in the development of human liver cancer. A metabolite of aflatoxin B1 reacts with DNA, forming adducts that cause mutations. To understand how different chemical forms of such adducts induce differing levels of mutations, Surajit Banerjee, Ph.D., Kyle Brown, Ph.D., […]

Lymphoma Factor Amps Up Metabolism

Friday, October 7th, 2011

The functions of most members of the enzyme family known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are unclear. Some PARP-related proteins are in a B aggressive lymphoma (BAL) protein family, which are highly expressed in certain types of B cell lymphomas – malignancies of the antibody-producing B lymphocytes. Sung Hoon Cho, Ph.D., Mark Boothby, M.D., Ph.D., […]