News: National Center for Research Resources

Study Reveals Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer Care

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

A study led by investigators from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), Nashville, Tenn., finds that black men with prostate cancer receive lower quality surgical care than white men. The racial differences persist even when controlling for factors such as the year of surgery, age, comorbidities and insurance status. Daniel Barocas, M.D., MPH, assistant professor of Urologic […]

Wilms’ Tumors Differ in Developing Nations

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Diseases that are treatable in developed nations are often lethal in developing countries. For Wilms’ tumor, the most common childhood kidney cancer, survival rates in developed countries exceed 90 percent – but in developing nations, survival can be as low as 35 percent. Lack of adequate health care resources is largely responsible for this survival […]

Lung Resections Not Always “Futile”

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

The gold standard for definitive diagnosis of a lung nodule is surgical removal (resection). However, between 10 percent and 30 percent of suspicious nodules are benign. Because thoracic operations are highly invasive and pose significant risks, these operations have been labeled “unnecessary” or “futile.” Eric Grogan, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues report that, even when surgical […]

Averting a Future Oncologist Shortage

Friday, November 4th, 2011

With an anticipated shortage of up to 4000 oncologists by 2020, retaining hematologists and oncologists in academic medicine is increasingly important. Because of the critical role of academic faculty in driving research and innovation, as well as in training and mentoring future oncologists, a decline in academic hematologists and oncologists could exacerbate the already anticipated […]

Protein Family Linked to Suppressing Tumors

Friday, October 28th, 2011

The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The new study, published Oct. 17 in Cancer Cell, identifies the protein SIRT2 as a tumor suppressor linked to gender-specific tumor development in mice. Along […]

Heart Protein May be Target for Colon Cancer Therapies

Friday, October 7th, 2011

A protein critical in heart development may also play a part in colon cancer progression. Research led by investigators fromVanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Vanderbilt Eye Institute suggests that the protein BVES (blood vessel endocardial substance) – which also is key in regulating corneal cells – may be a therapeutic target for halting colon cancer metastasis. The study, […]

Diversity Key in Antibody Repertoire

Friday, October 7th, 2011

Having antibodies diverse enough to neutralize a range of viruses is advantageous for preventing reinfection. But the molecular features that underlie this diversity (and how it is generated) are poorly understood. James Crowe, Jr., M.D., and colleagues previously isolated an antibody to 1918 influenza (called 2D1) that could also neutralize the 2009 H1N1 strain. In […]