News: National Institutes of Health

Next Page »« Previous Page

Open House Slated for TPSR

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

The Translational Pathology Shared Resource (TPSR) has opened an expanded laboratory on the first floor of Medical Center North, room S-1310. To celebrate the grand opening of the newly renovated space, TPSR is hosting an open house on Wednesday, May 30, from 1-3 p.m. Vanderbilt faculty and staff are invited to tour the new space, […]

New Drug Mutes More Melanomas

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Therapies targeted to a specific mutation in the BRAF gene can significantly reduce tumor burden in metastatic melanoma. But these therapies are not suitable for melanomas lacking the mutation, and even tumors carrying the BRAF mutation eventually become resistant to those therapies. Using human melanoma tumors implanted into mice, Ann Richmond, Ph.D., and colleagues assessed […]

Wilms’ Tumors Differ in Developing Nations

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Diseases that are treatable in developed nations are often lethal in developing countries. For Wilms’ tumor, the most common childhood kidney cancer, survival rates in developed countries exceed 90 percent – but in developing nations, survival can be as low as 35 percent. Lack of adequate health care resources is largely responsible for this survival […]

Newly Identified Stem Cells May Hold Clues to Colon Cancer

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have identified a new population of intestinal stem cells that may hold clues to the origin of colorectal cancer. This new stem cell population, reported March 30 in the journal Cell, appears to be relatively quiescent (inactive) – in contrast to the recent discovery of intestinal stem cells that multiply rapidly […]

Studies Pinpoint New Anti-Cancer Drug Target

Friday, February 24th, 2012

A few years ago, Alison Hanson, Ph.D., a student in Vanderbilt’s Medical Scientist Training Program, was invited to have lunch with a visiting Nobel laureate, Aaron Ciechanover, M.D., D.Sc. Hanson was working on her dissertation research at the time, and she described some interesting findings to Ciechanover. “He said, ‘that could either be a total […]

Grant Bolsters Cancer Research

Friday, January 13th, 2012

The National Cancer Institute has renewed a $4.4 million, five-year grant to fund training for senior fellows and junior faculty for careers in cancer-oriented research. The goal of the Vanderbilt Clinical Oncology Research Career Development Program is to train clinician scientists who can design and implement clinical oncology trials and lead translational research projects. The […]

VICC Named to Proteomic Cancer Research Consortium

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

A team of Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center scientists, led by Daniel Liebler, Ph.D., professor of Biochemistry, Biomedical Informatics and Pharmacology, has been selected to participate in the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), a multi-center cancer research program created by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Liebler will lead the Vanderbilt Proteome Characterization Center, one of five […]

Molecular Toxicology Leadership Transitions

Friday, November 18th, 2011

Internationally known toxicologist F. Peter (Fred) Guengerich, Ph.D., is stepping down as director of the Vanderbilt University Center in Molecular Toxicology, a position he has held for 30 years. Effective this month, Michael Aschner, Ph.D., became the new principal investigator (PI) of the center’s P30 core grant and the T32 training grant in Environmental Toxicology. […]

ASCB Honors Wente

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Susan Wente, Ph.D., associate vice chancellor for Research and professor of Cell & Developmental Biology, is the recipient of the 2011 Women in Cell Biology Senior Career Recognition Award from the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB). The award is given to senior researchers “whose outstanding scientific achievements are coupled with a long-standing record of […]

Protein Family Linked to Suppressing Tumors

Friday, October 28th, 2011

The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The new study, published Oct. 17 in Cancer Cell, identifies the protein SIRT2 as a tumor suppressor linked to gender-specific tumor development in mice. Along […]