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VICC’s Correa Honored with AACR Lectureship

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Pelayo Correa, M.D., professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunulogy, has been recognized by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and its Minorities in Cancer Research membership group with the Jane Cooke Wright Lectureship. Correa holds the Anne Potter Wilson chair in cancer research in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. The AACR-MICR-Jane Cooke […]

Newly Identified Stem Cells May Hold Clues to Colon Cancer

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have identified a new population of intestinal stem cells that may hold clues to the origin of colorectal cancer. This new stem cell population, reported March 30 in the journal Cell, appears to be relatively quiescent (inactive) – in contrast to the recent discovery of intestinal stem cells that multiply rapidly […]

Smoking Stokes Cells’ Cancer Capacity

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Smoking contributes to the vast majority (around 85 percent) of lung cancer cases. The TGF-beta signaling pathway – which regulates cell growth and proliferation – is altered in several cancer types, but little is known about how smoking affects this pathway. To investigate this, Debangshu Samanta, Pran Datta, Ph.D., and colleagues exposed human lung epithelial […]

iPOND Method Goes Fishing for Proteins

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Understanding DNA replication and DNA damage responses – which must proceed faithfully to prevent diseases such as cancer – requires the ability to monitor protein dynamics at active and damaged replication forks (sites of DNA duplication). Existing methods for studying replication fork machinery have been limited in resolution and sensitivity. Now, David Cortez, Ph.D., and […]

Colon Cancer’s Cellular Crossroads

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Colon cancer development and progression involves alterations in several cell signaling pathways. Activation of the Wnt pathway is involved in the early stages of tumor development, while inactivation of signaling through the TGF-beta pathway (which typically suppresses tumor formation) is involved in later stages. However, the interactions between these pathways remain unclear. R. Daniel Beauchamp, […]

Lung Cancer Screening Trial Helps First Patient

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Kathy Leiser first heard about Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center’s lung cancer screening trial through a sponsorship ad on WPLN radio last summer. The Nashville office technology saleswoman and grandmother of three had stopped smoking in 2009, but she knew her smoking history put her at risk for lung cancer. So she enrolled in the screening trial, […]

Urine Biomarker for Colon Cancer?

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

About half of colorectal tumors express elevated levels of COX-2, the key enzyme responsible for generating prostaglandins that promote cancer development. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is likely the primary mediator of most of COX-2’s tumor-promoting effects, and the PGE2 metabolite, PGE-M, can be measured noninvasively in urine. To assess the utility of PGE-M as a biomarker […]

Studies Pinpoint New Anti-Cancer Drug Target

Friday, February 24th, 2012

A few years ago, Alison Hanson, Ph.D., a student in Vanderbilt’s Medical Scientist Training Program, was invited to have lunch with a visiting Nobel laureate, Aaron Ciechanover, M.D., D.Sc. Hanson was working on her dissertation research at the time, and she described some interesting findings to Ciechanover. “He said, ‘that could either be a total […]

‘Acid Test’ for Cervical Cancer

Friday, February 17th, 2012

Women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) constitute one of the populations at highest risk for human papillomavirus-induced cervical cancer. While HIV-infected women in developing countries, such as India, are living longer thanks to antiretroviral therapy, their risk of invasive cervical cancer remains high due to lack of access to affordable and accurate cervical cancer […]

Drugs Reverse Lung Cancer Cell Changes

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

The protein transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) can act as either a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter depending on the stage of cancer. Loss of TGF-β’s tumor suppressor activity may play an important role in lung cancer progression. Pran Datta, Ph.D., and colleagues previously showed that this loss of responsiveness to TGF-β occurs mainly […]