The VICC.ORG Investigator Directory

Pampee Young, M.D., Ph.D.

Medical Director and Assistant Professor of Pathology and Medicine
VICC Member
Researcher

Contact Information:

Vanderbilt University Medical Center
1161 21st Ave 37232, C-3321-A MCN
Nashville, TN 37232-2561
615-936-1098
Fax: 615-343-7023

Education

  • M.D. - University of Texas Southwestern
  • Ph.D. - University of Texas at Dallas
  • Fellowship - University of Washington Medical Center
  • Residency - University of Washington Medical Center

 

Research Specialty:

The focus of research is on understanding the biology of adult stem cells within the context of two broad biological processes--malignancy and regeneration.

Research Description:

The focus of research is on understanding the biology of adult stem cells within the context of two broad biological processes--malignancy and regeneration. The role of adult stem cells to modulate repair and regeneration is of great interest. Our work focuses on gaining a better understanding of bone marrow derived stem cells using both mouse and human cells. Specifically, we are committed to understanding the characteristics of stem cell progenitors, their differentiation, the mechanism by which stem cells mediate regeneration and also the host/stem cell interactions.

Project 1

Mesenchymal stem cells hold much promise as tools to mediate repair. We have recently identified that Wnt pathway inhibition regulates MSC biology. We use mouse models of myocardial infarction or pressure overload hypertrophy (as a heart failure model) to study the role of wnt modulation in MSC-mediated repair. Our hope is to understand how to modulate endogenous MSCs after injury to control repair and regeneration.

Project 2

Bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are derived from both committed and uncommitted hematopoietic cells. We have characterized myeloid to endothelial plasticity over the last few years and have focused our attention on the mechanism of this plasticity. We have recently identified TNF as a modulator of endothelial differentiation. Moreover, we have also begun to better understand the role of these myelod/endothelial cells in cancer and regeneration.

Project 3

Our vascular system is impacted by both physiologic and pathologic biomechanical stress. We have identified that SPRR3 is a mechanosensitive protein expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells and have begun to study its role in the cardiovascular system using a mouse knockout model.

Clinical Interest:

Blood banking, transfusion practices, serology

Clincial Research Description:

The Vanderbilt University Blood Bank is undergoing automation as well as a major software installment. We continually strive to implement the best Transfusion Practices.

Publications:

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