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Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Pediatric Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders (The Pediatric MATCH Screening Trial)

Multiple Cancer Types

This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and / or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
Lymphoma, Miscellaneous, Pediatric Solid Tumors
N/A
Borinstein, Scott
NCT03155620
COGAPEC1621SC

An Open Label, Expanded Access Protocol using 131I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG) Therapy in Patients with Refractory Neuroblastoma, Pheochromocytoma, or Paraganglioma

Multiple Cancer Types

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics), Pediatric Solid Tumors
N/A
Kitko, Carrie
NCT01590680
VICCPED1249

Larotrectinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders with NTRK Fusions (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well larotrectinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with NTRK fusions that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Larotrectinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Miscellaneous, Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics), Pediatric Lymphoma, Pediatric Solid Tumors, Pediatrics, Wilms / Other Kidney (Pediatrics)
II
Borinstein, Scott
NCT03213704
COGAPEC1621A

Study to Learn More About the Safety and Effectiveness of the Drug VITRAKVI During Routine Use in Patients With TRK Fusion Cancer Which is Locally Advanced or Spread From the Place Where it Started to Other Places in the Body

Multiple Cancer Types

In this observational study researcher want to learn more about the effectiveness of drug VITRAKVI (generic name: larotrectinib) and how well the drug is tolerated during routine use in patients with TRK fusion cancer which is locally advanced or spread from the place where it started to other places in the body. TRK fusion cancer is a term used to describe a variety of common and rare cancers that are caused by a change to the NTRK (Neurotrophic Tyrosine Kinase) gene called a fusion. During this fusion, an NTRK gene joins together, or fuses, with a different gene. This joining results in the activation of certain proteins (TRK fusion proteins), which can cause cancer cells to multiply and form a tumor. VITRAKVI is an approved drug that blocks the action of the NTRK gene fusion. This study will enroll adult and paediatric patients suffering from a solid tumor with NTRK gene fusion for whom the decision to treat their disease with VITRAKVI has been made by their treating physicians. During the study, patients' medical information such as treatment information with VITRAKVI, other medication or treatments, changes in disease status and other health signs and symptoms will be collected within the normal medical care by the treating doctor. Participants will be observed over a period from 24 to 60 months.
Pediatric Solid Tumors, Pediatrics
N/A
Borinstein, Scott
NCT04142437
VICCPED2071

Cisplatin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children and Young Adults with Hepatoblastoma or Liver Cancer After Surgery

Multiple Cancer Types

This partially randomized phase II / III trial studies how well, in combination with surgery, cisplatin and combination chemotherapy works in treating children and young adults with hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, fluorouracil, vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, etoposide, irinotecan, sorafenib, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells than one type of chemotherapy alone.
Hepatoblastoma (Pediatrics), Pediatric Solid Tumors, Pediatrics
II/III
Benedetti, Daniel
NCT03533582
COGAHEP1531