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Aspirin in Preventing Colorectal Cancer in Patients with Colorectal Adenoma

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase IIa trial studies how well aspirin works in preventing colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal adenoma. Aspirin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
Colon, Rectal
II
Dai, Qi
NCT02965703
VICCGI17105

NN7999-3895: Safety and Efficacy of nonacog beta pegol (N9-GP) in Previously Untreated Patients with Haemophilia B

Hematologic

Hematologic
III
Wheeler, Allison
NCT02141074
VICCNCBH1756

Preserving Fertility After Colorectal Cancer: The PREFACE Study

Multiple Cancer Types

Colon, Rectal
N/A
Holowatyj, Andreana
NCT05239338
VICCGI2186

Study Evaluating mCRPC Treatment Using PSMA [Lu-177]-PNT2002 Therapy After Second-line Hormonal Treatment

Prostate

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of [Lu-177]-PNT2002 in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have progressed following treatment with androgen receptor axis-targeted therapy (ARAT).
Prostate
III
Schaffer, Kerry
NCT04647526
VICCURO20124

Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
III
Zarnegar-Lumley, Sara
NCT03959085
COGAALL1732

Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
III
Pastakia, Devang
NCT02176967
COGANBL1232

Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase IV trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system embryonal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
IV
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT02875314
VICCPED1751

CAR T Cell Therapy (YESCARTA) in the Outpatient Setting for the Treatment of Lymphoma

Lymphoma

This phase IV trial assesses the safety and feasibility of receiving chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy with YESCARTA in the outpatient setting, with fewer days spent as a patient in the hospital. YESCARTA is made from your own white blood cells, which will be modified in a laboratory to recognize and attack your lymphoma cells. Because YESCARTA is a specialized and fairly new therapy, patients currently receiving YESCARTA are typically required to spend several days in the hospital even if their treatment is well tolerated. This trial may help doctors determine if it is safe and feasible to give YESCARTA in the outpatient setting, with fewer days spent as a patient in the hospital.
Lymphoma
N/A
Oluwole, Olalekan
NCT05108805
VICCCTT2109

Enhanced Recovery After Surgery for Pain Management in Patients with Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Sarcoma

This clinical trial studies the effect of the ERAS pain management method in managing pain after surgery in patients with extremity soft tissue sarcoma. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery, or ERAS, is a pain management method that places emphasis on managing risk factors (things like smoking, nutrition and fitness), using multiple types of pain control, and early movement, with the goal of improving patient outcomes. ERAS has been shown to reduce the length of time some patients stay in the hospital, reduce complications from surgery, and even lower costs of some surgeries. ERAS is designed may help cut down on the use of these narcotics in managing the pain of surgery patients. The purpose of this trial is to demonstrate that ERAS is safe and effective for patients having surgery to treat their sarcoma. Specifically, this study will look at using a non-narcotic pain management program that includes other methods of managing the pain of sarcoma surgery patients.
Sarcoma
N/A
Lawrenz, Joshua
NCT04461171
VICCSAR2020

Study of Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab With Y-90 TARE in Patients With Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

Liver

This phase II trial tests whether atezolizumab and bevacizumab after Y-90 TARE works to shrink tumors in patients with hepatocellular (liver) cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Transarterial radioembolization is a minimally invasive procedure that combines embolization and radiation therapy to treat liver cancer. Tiny glass or resin beads filled with the radioactive isotope yttrium Y-90 are placed inside the blood vessels that feed the tumor. This blocks the supply of blood to the cancer cells and delivers a high dose of radiation to the tumor while sparing normal tissue. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Adding atezolizumab and bevacizumab after Y90 TARE may prevent liver cancer from returning for a longer period.
Liver
II
Goff, Laura
NCT04541173
VICCGI20110