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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



Study of IMMU-132 in HR+ / HER2- MBC (TROPICS-02)

Breast

This is an open-label, randomized, multicenter Phase 3 study to compare the efficacy and safety of Sacituzumab Govitecan versus TPC in subjects with metastatic or locally recurrent inoperable HR+ / HER2- MBC, after failure of at least 2, and no more than 4, prior chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease.
Breast
III
Mayer, Ingrid
NCT03901339
VICCBRE1942

Lactobacillus Plantarum in Preventing Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Children Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase III trial studies how well Lactobacillus plantarum works in preventing acute graft versus host disease in children undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Lactobacillus plantarum may help prevent the development of gastrointestinal graft versus host disease in children, adolescents, and young adults undergoing donor stem cell transplant.
Gastrointestinal, Pediatrics
III
Kitko, Carrie
NCT03057054
COGACCL1633

Pivotal Study in HER2 Negative, Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer

Breast

This is a phase 3, multicenter, open-label, randomized active-controlled, parallel group to investigate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of intravenous balixafortide given with eribulin versus eribulin alone in the treatment of HER2 negative, Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer.
Breast
III
Mayer, Ingrid
NCT03786094
VICCBRE1947

Firstline Pembrolizumab Alone or in Combination with Pemetrexed and Carboplatin in Induction / Maintenance or Postprogression in Treating Patients with Stage IV Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies whether pembrolizumab alone as a first-line treatment, followed by pemetrexed and carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab after disease progression is superior to induction with pembrolizumab, pemetrexed and carboplatin followed by pembrolizumab and pemetrexed maintenance in treating patients with stage IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving first-line pembrolizumab followed by pemetrexed and carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab works better in treating patients with non-squamous non-small cell cancer.
Lung, Non Small Cell
III
Horn, Leora
NCT03793179
ECOGTHOEA5163

A Study Comparing the Combination of Nivolumab and Ipilimumab Versus Placebo in Participants With Localized Renal Cell Carcinoma

Multiple Cancer Types

The purpose of this study is to determine whether the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab is safe and effective for delaying or preventing recurrence of cancer in patients who have experienced the partial or entire removal of a kidney
Kidney (Renal Cell), Urologic
III
Beckermann, Kathryn
NCT03138512
VICCURO1953

Perioperative Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Plus Cystectomy Versus Cystectomy Alone in Cisplatin-ineligible Participants With Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer (MK-3475-905 / KEYNOTE-905)

Bladder

A global, randomized phase III study to evaluate perioperative pembrolizumab with radical cystectomy + pelvic lymph node dissection (RC+PLND) versus RC+PLND alone in cisplatin-ineligible patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC).
Bladder
III
Davis, Nancy
NCT03924895
VICCURO1960

Chemoradiotherapy with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Localized Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

Bladder

This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.
Bladder
III
Kirschner, Austin
NCT03775265
NRGUROS1806

Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
III
Zarnegar-Lumley, Sara
NCT03959085
COGAALL1732

Study of Brimonidine Tartrate Nanoemulsion Eye Drops in Patients With Ocular Graft-vs-Host Disease

Hematologic

This study evaluates the use of Brimonidine tartrate nanoemulsion eye drop solution in the treatment of ocular Graft Verses Host Disease (oGVHD). Two thirds of participants will receive Brimonidine and one third will receive ophthalmic buffered saline (placebo).
Hematologic
III
Tran, Uyen
NCT03591874
VICCBMT19132

Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients with Down Syndrome

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.
Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Pediatric Leukemia
III
Friedman, Debra
NCT02521493
COGAAML1531

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