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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



Study of Sacituzumab Govitecan-hziy in Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

Multiple Cancer Types

The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sacituzumab govitecan-hziy in participants with metastatic urothelial cancer (mUC).
Bladder, Urologic
II
Davis, Nancy
NCT03547973
VICCURO18120

Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

Germ Cell (Pediatrics)

This phase III trial compares the effect of an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or accelerated schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors compared to the standard schedule.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics)
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT02582697
COGAGCT1532

A Study of Chemo Only Versus Chemo Plus Nivo With or Without BMS-986205, Followed by Post- Surgery Therapy With Nivo or Nivo and BMS-986205 in Patients With MIBC

Bladder

A study to evaluate nivolumab + chemotherapy or nivolumab / BMS-986205 + chemotherapy followed by continued Immuno-Oncology therapy after radical cystectomy (RC) compared with neoadjuvant standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy alone in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC)
Bladder
III
Davis, Nancy
NCT03661320
VICCURO18152

Radiation Therapy and Pembrolizumab or Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Stage III / IV p16 Positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Head/Neck

This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given with pembrolizumab or cisplatin in treating patients with stages III / IV p16-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the bodys immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving pembrolizumab during and after radiation therapy or cisplatin during radiation therapy works better in treating participants with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
Head/Neck
II
Gibson, Mike
NCT03383094
VICCHN1966

Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Etoposide, Carboplatin or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients with Germ Cell Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, etoposide, carboplatin or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The trial studies whether carboplatin or cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy to use in treating germ cell tumors.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Gynecologic, Ovarian
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT03067181
COGAGCT1531

De-intensified Radiation Therapy with Chemotherapy (Cisplatin) or Immunotherapy (Nivolumab) in Treating Patients with Early-Stage, HPV-Positive, Non-Smoking Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer

Head/Neck

This phase II / III trial studies how well a reduced dose of radiation therapy works with nivolumab compared to cisplatin in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer that is early in its growth and may not have spread to other parts of the body (early-stage), and is not associated with smoking. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the bodys immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see if a reduced dose of radiation therapy and nivolumab works as well as standard dose radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.
Head/Neck
II/III
Lockney, Natalie
NCT03952585
NRGHN005

Evaluating the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Atezolizumab to Standard Chemotherapy Treatment for Metastatic Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinomas That Originate Outside the Lung

Neuroendocrine

This phase II / III trial compares the effect of immunotherapy with atezolizumab in combination with standard chemotherapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide versus standard therapy alone for the treatment of poorly differentiated extrapulmonary (originated outside the lung) small cell neuroendocrine cancer. The other aim of this trial is to compare using atezolizumab just at the beginning of treatment versus continuing it beyond the initial treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cisplatin and carboplatin are in a class of medications known as platinum-containing compounds that work by killing, stopping or slowing the growth of cancer cells. Etoposide is in a class of medications known as podophyllotoxin derivatives. It blocks a certain enzyme needed for cell division and DNA repair, and it may kill cancer cells. Giving atezolizumab in combination with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide may work better in treating patients with poorly differentiated extrapulmonary small cell neuroendocrine cancer compared to standard therapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide alone.
Neuroendocrine
II/III
Das, Satya
NCT05058651
SWOGGIS2012

Testing the Addition of 131I-MIBG or Lorlatinib to Intensive Therapy in People with High-Risk Neuroblastoma (NBL)

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or lorlatinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Lorlatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or lorlatinib and standard therapy may work better compared to lorlatinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
III
Benedetti, Daniel
NCT03126916
COGANBL1531

Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase IV trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system embryonal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
IV
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT02875314
VICCPED1751

Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or did not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT02375204
COGA031102

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