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Testing the Ability to Decrease Chemotherapy in Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Who Have No Remaining Cancer at Surgery after Limited Pre-operative Chemotherapy and HER2-Targeted Therapy

Breast

This clinical trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab work in eliminating further chemotherapy after surgery in patients with HER2-positive stage II-IIIa breast cancer who have no cancer remaining at surgery (either in the breast or underarm lymph nodes) after pre-operative chemotherapy and HER2-targeted therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the bodys immune system. Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may enable fewer chemotherapy drugs to be given without compromising patient outcomes compared to the usual treatment.
Breast
II
Abramson, Vandana
NCT04266249
ECOGBREEA1181

Circulating Tumor DNA Testing in Predicting Treatment for Patients with Stage IIA Colon Cancer After Surgery, COBRA Trial

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II / III trial studies how well circulating tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) testing in the blood works to identify patients with stage IIA colon cancer who might benefit from additional treatment with chemotherapy after surgery. ctDNA are small pieces of genetic materials (DNA) that are shed by tumors into the blood. Finding ctDNA in the blood means that there are very likely small amounts of cancer remaining after surgery that may not be detectable using other tests, such as medical imaging. Testing for ctDNA levels may help identify patients with colon cancer who benefit from receiving chemotherapy after surgery. It is not yet known whether giving additional treatment with chemotherapy after surgery to patients who test positive for ctDNA and are at low risk for cancer recurrence would extend their time without disease compared to the usual approach (active surveillance).
Colon, Rectal
II/III
Agarwal, Rajiv
NCT04068103
SWOGGI005

Testing Pembrolizumab with Existing Cancer Therapy in Patients with Evidence of Residual Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

Leukemia

This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and persistent detection of minimal residual disease, defined as the levels of a gene product called bcr-abl in the blood. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the bodys immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, and bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared to dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib alone.
Leukemia
II
Mohan, Sanjay
NCT03516279
ECOGHEMEA9171

A Study to Compare Treatment with the Drug Selumetinib Alone versus Selumetinib and Vinblastine in Patients with Recurrent or Progressive Low-Grade Glioma

This phase III trial investigates the best dose of vinblastine in combination with selumetinib and the benefit of adding vinblastine to selumetinib compared to selumetinib alone in treating children and young adults with low-grade glioma (a common type of brain cancer) that has come back after prior treatment (recurrent) or does not respond to therapy (progressive). Selumetinib is a drug that works by blocking a protein that lets tumor cells grow without stopping. Vinblastine blocks cell growth by stopping cell division and may kill cancer cells. Giving selumetinib in combination with vinblastine may work better than selumetinib alone in treating recurrent or progressive low-grade glioma.
Not Available
III
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT04576117
COGACNS1931

A Study of a New Way to Treat Children and Young Adults with a Brain Tumor Called NGGCT

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II trial studies the best approach to combine chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) based on the patients response to induction chemotherapy in patients with non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCT) that have not spread to other parts of the brain or body (localized). This study has 2 goals: 1) optimizing radiation for patients who respond well to induction chemotherapy to diminish spinal cord relapses, 2) utilizing higher dose chemotherapy followed by conventional RT in patients who did not respond to induction chemotherapy. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, etoposide, ifosfamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays or high-energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Studies have shown that patients with newly-diagnosed localized NGGCT, whose disease responds well to chemotherapy before receiving radiation therapy, are more likely to be free of the disease for a longer time than are patients for whom the chemotherapy does not efficiently eliminate or reduce the size of the tumor. The purpose of this study is to see how well the tumors respond to induction chemotherapy to decide what treatment to give next. Some patients will be given RT to the spine and a portion of the brain. Others will be given high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant before RT to the whole brain and spine. Giving treatment based on the response to induction chemotherapy may lower the side effects of radiation in some patients and adjust the therapy to a more efficient one for other patients with localized NGGCT.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
II
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT04684368
COGACNS2021

Comparing an Alternative Surgical Procedure, Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN) Biopsy, with Standard Neck Dissection for Patients with Early-Stage Oral Cavity Cancer

Head/Neck

This phase II / III trial studies how well sentinel lymph node biopsy works and compares sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery to standard neck dissection as part of the treatment for early-stage oral cavity cancer. Sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery is a procedure that removes a smaller number of lymph nodes from your neck because it uses an imaging agent to see which lymph nodes are most likely to have cancer. Standard neck dissection, such as elective neck dissection, removes many of the lymph nodes in your neck. Using sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery may work better in treating patients with early-stage oral cavity cancer compared to standard elective neck dissection.
Head/Neck
II/III
Topf, Michael
NCT04333537
NRGHN006

A Study to Compare Blinatumomab Alone to Blinatumomab with Nivolumab in Patients Diagnosed with First Relapse B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL)

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II trial studies the effect of nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab compared to blinatumomab alone in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that has come back (relapsed). Down syndrome patients with relapsed B-ALL are included in this study. Blinatumomab is an antibody, which is a protein that identifies and targets specific molecules in the body. Blinatumomab searches for and attaches itself to the cancer cell. Once attached, an immune response occurs which may kill the cancer cell. Nivolumab is a medicine that may boost a patients immune system. Giving nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab may cause the cancer to stop growing for a period of time, and for some patients, it may lessen the symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the cancer.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
II
Zarnegar-Lumley, Sara
NCT04546399
COGAALL1821

Olaparib in Treating Patients with Advanced Glioma, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Solid Tumors with IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

Miscellaneous

This phase II trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with glioma, cholangiocarcinoma, or solid tumors with IDH1 or IDH2 mutations that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (refractory). Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
Miscellaneous
II
Davis, Elizabeth
NCT03212274
VICCMD18129ET-CT

Testing the Addition of Radiotherapy to the Usual Treatment (Chemotherapy) for Patients with Esophageal and Gastric Cancer that has Spread to a Limited Number of Other Places in the Body

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies how well the addition of radiotherapy to the usual treatment (chemotherapy) works compared to the usual treatment alone in treating patients with esophageal and gastric cancer that has spread to a limited number of other places in the body (oligometastatic disease). Radiotherapy uses high energy x-rays, gamma rays, or protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in usual chemotherapy, such as leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Adding radiotherapy to the usual chemotherapy may work better compared to the usual chemotherapy alone in treating patients with esophageal and gastric cancer.
Esophageal, Gastric/Gastroesophageal
III
Gibson, Mike
NCT04248452
ECOGGIEA2183

Testing the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Pembrolizumab to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Paclitaxel and Carboplatin) in Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

Gynecologic

This phase III trial studies how well the combination of pembrolizumab, paclitaxel and carboplatin works compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin alone in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III or IV, or has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the bodys immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Paclitaxel and carboplatin are chemotherapy drugs used as part of the usual treatment approach for this type of cancer. This study aims to assess if adding immunotherapy to these drugs is better or worse than the usual approach for treatment of this cancer.
Gynecologic
III
Brown, Alaina
NCT03914612
NRGGYNGY018