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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



LCH-IV, International Collaborative Treatment Protocol for Children and Adolescents With Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

Multiple Cancer Types

The LCH-IV is an international, multicenter, prospective clinical study for pediatric
Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis LCH (age < 18 years).
Miscellaneous, Pediatrics
III
Pastakia, Devang
NCT02205762
VICCPED2231

Tiragolumab and Atezolizumab for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory SMARCB1 or SMARCA4 Deficient Tumors

Pediatrics

This phase I/II trial studies how well tiragolumab and atezolizumab works when given to children and adults with SMARCB1 or SMARCA4 deficient tumors that that has either come back (relapsed) or does not respond to therapy (refractory). SMARCB1 or SMARCA4 deficiency means that tumor cells are missing the SMARCB1 and SMARCA4 genes, seen with some aggressive cancers that are typically hard to treat. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as tiragolumab and atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
Pediatrics
I/II
Borinstein, Scott
NCT05286801
COGPEPN2121

Enasidenib for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with an IDH2 Mutation

Multiple Cancer Types

This trial studies the side effects of enasidenib and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after treatment (relapsed) or has been difficult to treat with chemotherapy (refractory). Patients must also have a specific genetic change, also called a mutation, in a protein called IDH2. Enasidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking the mutated IDH2 protein, which is needed for cell growth.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
II
Smith, Brianna
NCT04203316
COGADVL18P1

Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Etoposide, Carboplatin or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients with Germ Cell Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors for recurrence after their tumor is removed. When the germ cell tumors has spread outside of the organ in which it developed, it is considered metastatic. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The trial studies whether carboplatin or cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy to use in treating metastatic standard risk germ cell tumors.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Gynecologic, Ovarian
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT03067181
COGAGCT1531

A Study of a New Way to Treat Children and Young Adults with a Brain Tumor Called NGGCT

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II trial studies the best approach to combine chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) based on the patients response to induction chemotherapy in patients with non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCT) that have not spread to other parts of the brain or body (localized). This study has 2 goals: 1) optimizing radiation for patients who respond well to induction chemotherapy to diminish spinal cord relapses, 2) utilizing higher dose chemotherapy followed by conventional RT in patients who did not respond to induction chemotherapy. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, etoposide, ifosfamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays or high-energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Studies have shown that patients with newly-diagnosed localized NGGCT, whose disease responds well to chemotherapy before receiving radiation therapy, are more likely to be free of the disease for a longer time than are patients for whom the chemotherapy does not efficiently eliminate or reduce the size of the tumor. The purpose of this study is to see how well the tumors respond to induction chemotherapy to decide what treatment to give next. Some patients will be given RT to the spine and a portion of the brain. Others will be given high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant before RT to the whole brain and spine. Giving treatment based on the response to induction chemotherapy may lower the side effects of radiation in some patients and adjust the therapy to a more efficient one for other patients with localized NGGCT.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
II
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT04684368
COGACNS2021

Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase IV trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system embryonal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
IV
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT02875314
VICCPED1751

Renal Tumors Classification, Biology, and Banking Study

Multiple Cancer Types

Pediatrics, Wilms / Other Kidney (Pediatrics)
N/A
Benedetti, Daniel
NCT00898365
COGAREN03B2

Studying Health Outcomes after Treatment in Patients with Retinoblastoma, RIVERBOAT Study

Multiple Cancer Types

This trial studies health outcomes after treatment in patients with retinoblastoma. Gathering health information over time from patients and family members through vision assessments, samples of tissue and saliva, and questionnaires may help doctors learn more about what causes retinoblastoma, identify long-term health outcomes for patients with retinoblastoma, and find out which therapies may be the best for treating retinoblastoma.
Pediatrics, Retinoblastoma (Pediatrics)
N/A
Friedman, Debra
NCT03932786
VICCPED1878

A Study to See if Memantine Protects the Brain during Radiation Therapy Treatment for Primary Central Nervous System Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial compares memantine to usual treatment in treating patients with primary central nervous system tumors. Memantine may block receptors (parts of nerve cells) in the brain known to contribute to a decline in cognitive function. Giving memantine may make a difference in cognitive function (attention, memory, or other thought processes) in children and adolescents receiving brain radiation therapy to treat a primary central nervous system tumors.
Neuro-Oncology, Pediatrics
III
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT04939597
COGACCL2031

Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention in Improving Long Term Health in Children and Adolescents with Cancer

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized clinical phase III trial studies how well web-based physical activity intervention works in improving long term health in children and adolescents with cancer. Regular physical activity after receiving treatment for cancer may help to maintain a healthy weight and improve energy levels and overall health.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
N/A
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT03223753
COGALTE1631

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