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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



Treatment with Dinutuximab, Sargramostim (GM-CSF), and Isotretinoin in Combination with Irinotecan and Temozolomide after Intensive Therapy for People with High-Risk Neuroblastoma (NBL)

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II trial studies if dinutuximab, GM-CSF, isotretinoin in combination with irinotecan, and temozolomide (chemo-immunotherapy) can be given safely to patients with high-risk neuroblastoma after Consolidation therapy (which usually consists of two autologous stem cell transplants and radiation) who have not experienced worsening or recurrence of their disease. Dinutuximab represents a kind of cancer therapy called immunotherapy. Unlike chemotherapy and radiation, dinutuximab targets the cancer cells without destroying nearby healthy cells. Sargramostim helps the body produce normal infection-fighting white blood cells. Isotretinoin helps the neuroblastoma cells become more mature. These 3 drugs (standard immunotherapy) are already given to patients with high-risk neuroblastoma after Consolidation because they have been proven to be beneficial in this setting. Chemotherapy drugs, such as irinotecan and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. They may also effect how well immunotherapy works on neuroblastoma cells. Giving chemo-immunotherapy after intensive therapy may work better in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma compared to standard immunotherapy.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
II
Benedetti, Daniel
NCT04385277
COGANBL19P1

Testing Nivolumab and Ipilimumab with Short-Course Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

This phase II trial investigates the effect of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with short-course radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.
Not Available
II
Ciombor, Kristen
NCT04751370
ECOGGIEA2201

Testing the Use of Steroids and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors with Blinatumomab or Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults

Leukemia

This phase III trial compares the effect of usual treatment of chemotherapy and steroids and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to the same treatment plus blinatumomab. Blinatumomab is a Bi-specific T-Cell Engager (BiTE) that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. The information gained from this study may help researchers determine if combination therapy with steroids, TKIs, and blinatumomab work better than the standard of care.
Leukemia
III
Strickland, Stephen
NCT04530565
ECOGHEMEA9181

Long-term Safety and Efficacy Extension Study for Participants With Advanced Tumors Who Are Currently on Treatment or in Follow-up in a Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Study (MK-3475-587 / KEYNOTE-587)

Miscellaneous

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in participants from previous Merck pembrolizumab-based parent studies who roll-over into this extension study. This study will consist of three phases: 1) First Course Phase, 2) Survival Follow-up Phase or 3) Second Course Phase. Each participant will roll-over to this extension study in one of the following three phases, depending on the study phase they were in at the completion of the parent study. Participants who were in the First Course Phase of study treatment in their parent study will enter the First Course Phase of this study and complete up to 35 doses or more every 3 weeks (Q3W) or 17 doses or more every 6 weeks (Q6W) of study treatment with pembrolizumab or a pembrolizumab-based combination according to arm assignment. Participants who were in the Follow-up Phase in the parent study (post-treatment or Survival Follow-up Phase) will enter the Survival Follow-up Phase of this study. Participants who were in the Second Course Phase in their parent study will enter Second Course Phase of this study and complete up to 17 doses Q3W or 8 doses Q6W of study treatment with pembrolizumab or a pembrolizumab-based combination according to arm assignment. Any participant originating from a parent trial where crossover to pembrolizumab was permitted upon disease progression may be may be eligible for 35 doses as Q3W or 17 doses Q6W of pembrolizumab (approximately 2 years), if they progress while on the control arm and pembrolizumab is approved for the indication in the country where the potential eligible crossover participant is being evaluated.
Miscellaneous
III
Ancell, Kristin
NCT03486873
VICCMD1932

Testing the Addition of Pembrolizumab, an Immunotherapy Cancer Drug to Olaparib Alone as Therapy for Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Has Spread with Inherited BRCA Mutations

Pancreatic

This phase II trial studies whether adding pembrolizumab to olaparib (standard of care) works better than olaparib alone in treating patients with pancreatic cancer with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). BRCA1 and BRCA2 are human genes that produce tumor suppressor proteins. These proteins help repair damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and, therefore, play a role in ensuring the stability of each cells genetic material. When either of these genes is mutated, or altered, such that its protein product is not made or does not function correctly, DNA damage may not be repaired properly. As a result, cells are more likely to develop additional genetic alterations that can lead to some types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, a protein that helps repair damaged DNA. Blocking PARP may help keep tumor cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. The addition of pembrolizumab to the usual treatment of olaparib may help to shrink tumors in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.
Pancreatic
II
Cardin, Dana
NCT04548752
SWOGGIS2001

Testing A New Combination of Anti-cancer Immune Therapies, Atezolizumab and CDX-1127 (Varlilumab) with or without the Addition of A Third Anti-cancer Drug, Cobimetinib, for Advanced-Stage Biliary Tract Cancer

Liver

This phase II trial investigates the effect of combining two immune therapies, atezolizumab and CDX-1127 (varlilumab), with or without cobimetinib, in treating patients with biliary tract cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Varlilumab is an immune agonist antibody that may further strengthen the immune systems attack on the cancer. Cobimetinib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of an abnormal protein that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps slow or stop the spread of cancer cells. Giving atezolizumab in combination with varlilumab and cobimetinib may work better than atezolizumab and varlilumab alone in treating patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer.
Liver
II
Goff, Laura
NCT04941287
VICCNCIGI10476

Nivolumab with or without Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Recurrent Resectable Osteosarcoma

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of azacitidine and how well it works with or without nivolumab in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) and can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab and azacitidine together may work better compared to nivolumab alone in treating patients with osteosarcoma.
Phase I, Sarcoma
I/II
Borinstein, Scott
NCT03628209
VICCPED2012

Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
III
Zarnegar-Lumley, Sara
NCT03959085
COGAALL1732

A Study to Investigate Blinatumomab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with or without Down syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the bodys immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatric Lymphoma, Pediatrics
III
Zarnegar-Lumley, Sara
NCT03914625
COGAALL1731

Evaluating the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Atezolizumab to Standard Chemotherapy Treatment for Metastatic Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinomas That Originate Outside the Lung

Neuroendocrine

This phase II / III trial compares the effect of immunotherapy with atezolizumab in combination with standard chemotherapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide versus standard therapy alone for the treatment of poorly differentiated extrapulmonary (originated outside the lung) small cell neuroendocrine cancer. The other aim of this trial is to compare using atezolizumab just at the beginning of treatment versus continuing it beyond the initial treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cisplatin and carboplatin are in a class of medications known as platinum-containing compounds that work by killing, stopping or slowing the growth of cancer cells. Etoposide is in a class of medications known as podophyllotoxin derivatives. It blocks a certain enzyme needed for cell division and DNA repair, and it may kill cancer cells. Giving atezolizumab in combination with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide may work better in treating patients with poorly differentiated extrapulmonary small cell neuroendocrine cancer compared to standard therapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide alone.
Neuroendocrine
II/III
Das, Satya
NCT05058651
SWOGGIS2012

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