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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



A Study of a New Way to Treat Children and Young Adults with a Brain Tumor Called NGGCT

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II trial studies the best approach to combine chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) based on the patients response to induction chemotherapy in patients with non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCT) that have not spread to other parts of the brain or body (localized). This study has 2 goals: 1) optimizing radiation for patients who respond well to induction chemotherapy to diminish spinal cord relapses, 2) utilizing higher dose chemotherapy followed by conventional RT in patients who did not respond to induction chemotherapy. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, etoposide, ifosfamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays or high-energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Studies have shown that patients with newly-diagnosed localized NGGCT, whose disease responds well to chemotherapy before receiving radiation therapy, are more likely to be free of the disease for a longer time than are patients for whom the chemotherapy does not efficiently eliminate or reduce the size of the tumor. The purpose of this study is to see how well the tumors respond to induction chemotherapy to decide what treatment to give next. Some patients will be given RT to the spine and a portion of the brain. Others will be given high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant before RT to the whole brain and spine. Giving treatment based on the response to induction chemotherapy may lower the side effects of radiation in some patients and adjust the therapy to a more efficient one for other patients with localized NGGCT.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
II
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT04684368
COGACNS2021

A Study to See if Memantine Protects the Brain during Radiation Therapy Treatment for Primary Central Nervous System Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial compares memantine to usual treatment in treating patients with primary central nervous system tumors. Memantine may block receptors (parts of nerve cells) in the brain known to contribute to a decline in cognitive function. Giving memantine may make a difference in cognitive function (attention, memory, or other thought processes) in children and adolescents receiving brain radiation therapy to treat a primary central nervous system tumors.
Neuro-Oncology, Pediatrics
III
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT04939597
COGACCL2031

MRI and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT Scan for Assessing Tumor Hypoxia and Guiding Adaptive Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer or Brain Metastases

Miscellaneous

This clinical trial is studying how well magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans works in assessing a decrease in the amount of oxygen (hypoxia) in tumor cells and in guiding adaptive radiation treatment in patients with head and neck cancer or cancer that has spread to the brain from where it first started (brain metastasis). Both head and neck cancer and brain metastases can be treated with radiation. Previous research studies have shown that the amount of oxygen that goes towards cancer cells prior to their radiation treatments predicts how the cancer cells will respond to radiation treatment. MRI is a type of imaging technique that uses radio waves and large magnets to produce detailed images of areas inside the body. 18F-FMISO is a radioactive substance that binds to hypoxic tumor cells and emits radiation, allowing the tumor cells to be visualized using PET/CT, which is an imaging technique that combines PET and CT in a single machine. It is used to make detailed, computerized images of inside the body. By combining MRI with 18F-FMISO PET/CT, researchers may be able to develop an MRI sequence that can be used to evaluate hypoxia in tumor cells and predict response to treatment in patients with head and neck cancer or brain metastases.
Miscellaneous
Early I
De vis, Jill
NCT05996432
VICC-EDMDT23195

Evaluating the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Atezolizumab to Standard Chemotherapy Treatment for Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Carcinomas That Originate Outside the Lung

Neuroendocrine

This phase II/III trial compares the effect of immunotherapy with atezolizumab in combination with standard chemotherapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide versus standard therapy alone for the treatment of poorly differentiated extrapulmonary (originated outside the lung) neuroendocrine cancer that may have spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) or that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic). The other aim of this trial is to compare using atezolizumab just at the beginning of treatment versus continuing it beyond the initial treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cisplatin and carboplatin are in a class of medications known as platinum-containing compounds that work by killing, stopping or slowing the growth of cancer cells. Etoposide is in a class of medications known as podophyllotoxin derivatives. It blocks a certain enzyme needed for cell division and DNA repair, and it may kill cancer cells. Giving atezolizumab in combination with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide may work better in treating patients with poorly differentiated extrapulmonary neuroendocrine cancer compared to standard therapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide alone.
Neuroendocrine
II/III
Ramirez, Robert
NCT05058651
SWOGGIS2012

Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

Germ Cell (Pediatrics)

This phase III trial compares the effect of an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or accelerated schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors compared to the standard schedule.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics)
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT02582697
COGAGCT1532

Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase IV trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system embryonal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
IV
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT02875314
VICCPED1751

Comparing the Outcome of Standard Systemic Therapy Only versus Standard Systemic therapy with either Surgery or Radiation Therapy, for Patients with Advanced Prostate cancer

Prostate

This phase III trial compare the effects of adding definitive treatment (either radiation therapy or prostate removal surgery) to standard systemic therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Removing the prostate by either surgery or radiation therapy in addition to standard systemic therapy for prostate cancer may lower the chance of the cancer growing or spreading.
Prostate
III
Rini, Brian
NCT03678025
SWOGUROS1802

Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation in Sickle Cell Patients (BMTCTN1507)

Hematologic

This is a Phase II, single arm, multi-center trial, designed to estimate the efficacy and
toxicity of haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in patients with sickle cell
disease (SCD). Based on their age and entry criteria patients are stratified into two groups:
(1) children with severe SCD; and (2) adults with severe SCD.
Hematologic
II
Kassim, Adetola
NCT03263559
VICCNCCTT1759

Capecitabine Compared to Endocrine Therapy for the Treatment of Non-luminal A Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

Breast

This phase II trial compares the effect of capecitabine to endocrine therapy in patients with non-Luminal A hormone receptor-positive breast cancer that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic). In this study, patients submit a sample of tumor for testing to determine if their breast cancer is considered non-Luminal A. Only patients with non-Luminal A receive study treatment. In the future, doctors hope that this test can assist in picking the best treatment for patients with this type of cancer. Capecitabine is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. It is taken up by tumor cells and breaks down into fluorouracil, a substance that kills tumor cells. Endocrine therapy is treatment that adds, blocks, or removes hormones. To slow or stop the growth of certain cancers (such as prostate and breast cancer), synthetic hormones or other drugs may be given to block the body's natural hormones. Giving capecitabine as compared to endocrine therapy may kill more tumor cells in patients with metastatic breast cancer.
Breast
II
Reid, Sonya
NCT05693766
VICCBRE2256

cfDNA Assay Prospective Observational Validation for Early Cancer Detection and Minimal Residual Disease

Miscellaneous

This is an observational case-control study to train and validate a genome-wide methylome
enrichment platform to detect multiple cancer types and to differentiate amongst cancer
types. The cancers included in this study are brain, breast, bladder, cervical, colorectal,
endometrial, esophageal, gastric, head and neck, hepatobiliary, leukemia, lung, lymphoma,
multiple myeloma, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, renal, sarcoma, and thyroid. These cancers
were selected based on their prevalence and mortality to maximize impact on clinical care.

Additionally, the ability of the whole-genome methylome enrichment platform to detect minimal
residual disease after completion of cancer treatment and to detect relapse prior to clinical
presentation will be evaluated in four cancer types (breast, colorectal, lung, prostate).
These cancers were selected based on the existing clinical landscape and treatment
availability.
Miscellaneous
N/A
Rini, Brian
NCT05366881
VICCMD21111

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