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Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Program

Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers remain some of the most difficult to treat, with five-year survival rates below 50 percent for most GI cancer types.

The Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Program aims to better understand what drives these cancers with the goal of identifying and applying better treatment strategies. Our research efforts span the entire spectrum—from in-depth basic research to investigator-initiated clinical trials—across all GI cancer types, including colorectal, gastroesophageal, and pancreatic cancers.

RESEARCH THEMES

The Gastrointestinal Cancer Program supports basic, translational and clinical research across all GI cancer types:

Determining the etiology and pathogenesis of gastrointestinal cancers

Developing biomarkers and imaging techniques to improve detection and predict efficacy of current and novel therapeutics for gastrointestinal cancers

Developing and studying novel laboratory models of cancer to improve understanding of human cancers

Translating laboratory discoveries into clinical investigations

Meet the Program Members

R. Daniel Beauchamp, M.D., and Jordan Berlin, M.D., are co-leaders of the GI Cancer Research Program. The program has more than 30 members conducting clinical and translational research on a range of gastrointestinal cancers, with particular focus on colorectal, gastroesophageal and pancreas cancers.  


Featured Publications

Program News

February 14, 2019

Probing H. pylori cancer protein

A new study improves the understanding of how the stomach-dwelling bacterium Helicobacter pylori influences the risk of premalignant and malignant changes in the stomach.
January 24, 2019

Major grant to bolster research on inflammation-related cancers

Cancer Research UK has awarded a 20-million-pound grant (about $26 million U.S.) to a team of international investigators, including Vanderbilt’s James Goldenring, MD, PhD, to study inflammation-related cancers.
September 27, 2018

Cancer Moonshot award to help map tumor progression

A trans-institutional team of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt University has received an $11 million Cancer Moonshot grant to build a single-cell resolution atlas to map out the routes that benign colonic polyps take to progress to colorectal cancer.

Seminars & Events

GI-Events

19 February 2019