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Lung cancer metastasis-National Cancer Institute \ Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Host-Tumor Interactions Research Program

Tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis depend not only on the tumor cell alone, but also on the complex interactions between the tumor cells and their host. The goal of the Host-Tumor Interactions Research Program is to develop a detailed and mechanistic understanding of not just the tumor cell and tumor mutations, but also all the components of the host microenvironment that influence cancer and the response to cancer therapy.

RESEARCH THEMES

With the goal of understanding how complex interactions between tumor cells and their host contribute to cancer, the Host-Tumor Interactions program focuses on four specific research themes:

Understanding how new blood vessels form to feed tumors – and finding ways to block these processes

Identifying molecules involved in communication between tumor cells and their cellular and structural microenvironment

Uncovering how inflammation triggers and promotes cancer

Integrating knowledge about host-tumor interactions to understand how tumors evolve in a changing microenvironment

Meet the Program Members

The Host-Tumor Interactions program is co-led by Mary M. Zutter, M.D., and Jeffrey Rathmell, Ph.D. The basic, translational, and clinical scientists who make up this program are focused on discovering and understanding these interactions, with the ultimate goal of developing strategies to control tumor progression and metastasis by targeting these interactions.


Featured Publications

Program News

May 30, 2019

Gore, King elected to 2019 IAMBE Class of Fellows

John Gore, PhD, director of the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (VUIIS), and Michael King, PhD, J. Lawrence Wilson Professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University, were recently elected to the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE) 2019 Class of Fellows in recognition of their contributions in the field of medical and biological engineering.
May 30, 2019

Byndloss selected for NIH future research leaders conference

Mariana Byndloss, DVM, PhD, assistant professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, has been selected to participate in the Future Research Leaders Conference at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
May 16, 2019

The dynamic basement

A recent study presents a new way to analyze the repair of basement membranes, important structural and functional components of tissues that are subject to environmental damage.