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Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Research Program

The Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Research Program translates advances in mechanism-based research into improved detection methods and therapies for cancer. With a primary focus on lung cancer, melanoma and leukemia/lymphoma, the program is dedicated to new discoveries in early detection and molecular oncology, and genotype-driven early phase trials for all cancer types.

RESEARCH THEMES

The Translational Research and Interventional Oncology program is dedicated to translating our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis and tumor progression into novel therapeutic strategies for cancer. 

Developing early phase clinical trials for therapies directed at genetic changes in tumors

Investigating why some tumors become resistant to genetically targeted therapies and developing new strategies to prevent and overcome resistance

Applying and enhancing immune strategies and cellular therapies for cancer

Developing and evaluating screening methods and biomarkers for early detection of lung cancers

Meet the Program Members

The Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Program is the largest of the cancer center's formal research programs, with more than 50 members representing a range of clinical and translational cancer research areas. The program is led by Madan Jagasia, M.B.B.S., Young Kim, M.D., Ph.D., and Christine Lovly, M.D., Ph.D.

Featured Publications

Program News

August 9, 2019

Grant bolsters research on myelodysplastic syndromes

Michael Savona, MD, professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology, and director of Hematology Research at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, has received a competitive grant award from the Edward P. Evans Foundation.
July 22, 2019

Encephalitis identified as rare toxicity of immunotherapy treatment

Researchers are chronicling rare but serious toxicities that may occur with immune checkpoint inhibitors, the most widely prescribed class of immunotherapies.
June 29, 2019

Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy

More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study published June 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.