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Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Research Program

The Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Research Program translates advances in mechanism-based research into improved detection methods and therapies for cancer. With a primary focus on lung cancer, melanoma and leukemia/lymphoma, the program is dedicated to new discoveries in early detection and molecular oncology, and genotype-driven early phase trials for all cancer types.

RESEARCH THEMES

The Translational Research and Interventional Oncology program is dedicated to translating our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis and tumor progression into novel therapeutic strategies for cancer. 

Developing early phase clinical trials for therapies directed at genetic changes in tumors

Investigating why some tumors become resistant to genetically targeted therapies and developing new strategies to prevent and overcome resistance

Applying and enhancing immune strategies and cellular therapies for cancer

Developing and evaluating screening methods and biomarkers for early detection of lung cancers

Meet the Program Members

The Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Program is the largest of the cancer center's formal research programs, with more than 50 members representing a range of clinical and translational cancer research areas. The program is led by Madan Jagasia, M.B.B.S., Young Kim, M.D., Ph.D., and Christine Lovly, M.D., Ph.D.

Featured Publications

Program News

March 4, 2019

Investigators map genomic landscape of very rare cancer

Vanderbilt researchers have mapped out the genomic landscape of a metastatic malignant proliferating tricholemmal tumor and identified a targeted treatment for this very rare cancer.
March 4, 2019

Achilles’ heel for kidney cancer

A recent study found that renal cell carcinoma cells with mutations in an enzyme-encoding gene, SETD2, were sensitive to a drug that inhibits the enzyme PI3K-beta.
February 25, 2019

New algorithm calculates drug synergy; initial tests involve melanoma, lung cancer

Drug combinations used for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and melanoma aren’t as effective as they could be. That could change with a new algorithm developed by a cross-disciplinary Vanderbilt University team for calculating drug synergy.

Seminars & Events

TRIO-Events

23 April 2019