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Consuelo Wilkins, MD, MSCI, Senior Vice President for Health Equity and Inclusive Excellence for Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and Senior Associate Dean for Health Equity and Inclusive Excellence for Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, always knew she wanted to be a physician. "Health equity was built into everything I did, even if I didn’t know it or recognize it at the time," Wilkins said. "I have always learned and believed that people are the same — everyone deserves to be healthy, and everyone should have the best opportunities to take care of themselves and their families." Click below to learn more about health equity initiatives.

https://momentum.vicc.org/2021/09/everyone-deserves-to-be-healthy/
Vanderbilt was the lead site for an NIH-funded, phase 2, multicenter influenza vaccine study in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients that may lead to a change in the current flu vaccine recommendations in this vulnerable population. Natasha Halasa, MD, MPH and colleagues recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, that two doses of high-dose trivalent flu vaccine resulted in higher amounts of influenza-specific antibodies than two doses of standard dose quadrivalent vaccine.

https://news.vumc.org/2023/03/02/high-dose-flu-vaccine-beneficial-for-pediatric-stem-cell-transplant-patients/

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Mismatched Related Donor versus Matched Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial compares hematopoietic (stem) cell transplantation (HCT) using mismatched related donors (haploidentical [haplo]) versus matched unrelated donors (MUD) in treating children, adolescents, and young adults with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). HCT is considered standard of care treatment for patients with high-risk acute leukemia and MDS. In HCT, patients are given very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which is intended to kill cancer cells that may be resistant to more standard doses of chemotherapy; unfortunately, this also destroys the normal cells in the bone marrow, including stem cells. After the treatment, patients must have a healthy supply of stem cells reintroduced or transplanted. The transplanted cells then reestablish the blood cell production process in the bone marrow. The healthy stem cells may come from the blood or bone marrow of a related or unrelated donor. If patients do not have a matched related donor, doctors do not know what the next best donor choice is or if a haplo related donor or MUD is better. This trial may help researchers understand whether a haplo related donor or a MUD HCT for children with acute leukemia or MDS is better or if there is no difference at all.
Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatric Lymphoma, Pediatrics
III
Kitko, Carrie
NCT05457556
COGASCT2031

Spearhead 1 Study in Subjects With Advanced Synovial Sarcoma or Myxoid/Round Cell Liposarcoma

Sarcoma

This is a study to investigate the efficacy and safety of ADP-A2M4 in HLA-A*02 eligible and
MAGE-A4 positive subjects with metastatic or inoperable (advanced) Synovial Sarcoma (Cohort
1, 2 and 3 ) or MRCLS (Cohort 1) .
Sarcoma
II
Keedy, Vicki
NCT04044768
VICCSAR1948

Study Evaluating Brexucabtagene Autoleucel (KTE-X19) in Pediatric and Adolescent Participants With Relapsed/Refractory B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Pediatric Leukemia

The primary objectives of this study are to evaluate the safety and efficacy of
brexucabtagene autoleucel (KTE-X19) in pediatric and adolescent participants with
relapsed/refractory (r/r) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or relapsed or
refractory (r/r) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

As of October 2022, no further patients with acute B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)
will be asked to join the study. The study remains open for recruitment for patients that
have B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL).
Pediatric Leukemia
I/II
Kitko, Carrie
NCT02625480
VICCPED15143

Venetoclax in Children With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Multiple Cancer Types

A study to evaluate if the randomized addition of venetoclax to a chemotherapy backbone
(fludarabine/cytarabine/gemtuzumab ozogamicin [GO]) improves survival of
children/adolescents/young adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 1st relapse who are
unable to receive additional anthracyclines, or in 2nd relapse.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
III
Smith, Christine
NCT05183035
VICCPED2237

Selinexor and Venetoclax in Combination with Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase I trial evaluates the side effects and best dose of selinexor and venetoclax in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or acute leukemia of ambiguous linage that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Selinexor may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking CRM1, which help the body's immune system to find and kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Colony-stimulating factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving venetoclax and selinexor with chemotherapy may help control the disease in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage.
Leukemia, Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics, Phase I
I
Smith, Brianna
NCT04898894
VICCPEDP2235

Conditioning SCID Infants Diagnosed Early

Multiple Cancer Types

The investigators want to study if lower doses of chemotherapy will help babies with SCID to
achieve good immunity with less short and long-term risks of complications after
transplantation. This trial identifies babies with types of immune deficiencies that are most
likely to succeed with this approach and offers them transplant early in life before they get
severe infections or later if their infections are under control. It includes only patients
receiving unrelated or mismatched related donor transplants.

The study will test if patients receiving transplant using either a low dose busulfan or a
medium dose busulfan will have immune recovery of both T and B cells, measured by the ability
to respond to immunizations after transplant. The exact regimen depends on the subtype of
SCID the patient has. Donors used for transplant must be unrelated or half-matched related
(haploidentical) donors, and peripheral blood stem cells must be used. To minimize the chance
of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the stem cells will have most, but not all, of the T
cells removed, using a newer, experimental approach of a well-established technology. Once
the stem cell transplant is completed, patients will be followed for 3 years. Approximately
9-18 months after the transplant, vaccinations will be administered, and a blood test
measuring whether your child's body has responded to the vaccine will be collected.
Hematologic, Pediatrics
II
Connelly, James
NCT03619551
VICCNCPED18122

A Trial Comparing Unrelated Donor BMT With IST for Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Severe Aplastic Anemia (TransIT, BMT CTN 2202)

Pediatrics

Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA) is a rare condition in which the body stops producing enough new
blood cells. SAA can be cured with immune suppressive therapy or a bone marrow transplant.
Regular treatment for patients with aplastic anemia who have a matched sibling (brother or
sister), or family donor is a bone marrow transplant. Patients without a matched family donor
normally are treated with immune suppressive therapy (IST). Match unrelated donor (URD) bone
marrow transplant (BMT) is used as a secondary treatment in patients who did not get better
with IST, had their disease come back, or a new worse disease replaced it (like leukemia).

This trial will compare time from randomization to failure of treatment or death from any
cause of IST versus URD BMT when used as initial therapy to treat SAA.

The trial will also assess whether health-related quality of life and early markers of
fertility differ between those randomized to URD BMT or IST, as well as assess the presence
of marrow failure-related genes and presence of gene mutations associated with MDS or
leukemia and the change in gene signatures after treatment in both study arms.

This study treatment does not include any investigational drugs. The medicines and procedures
in this study are standard for treatment of SAA.
Pediatrics
III
Connelly, James
NCT05600426
VICCPED2295