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Testing the Addition of 131I-MIBG or Lorlatinib to Intensive Therapy in People with High-Risk Neuroblastoma (NBL)

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or lorlatinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Lorlatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or lorlatinib and standard therapy may work better compared to lorlatinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
III
Benedetti, Daniel
NCT03126916
COGANBL1531

Conditioning SCID Infants Diagnosed Early

Multiple Cancer Types

The investigators want to study if lower doses of chemotherapy will help babies with SCID to achieve good immunity with less short and long-term risks of complications after transplantation. This trial identifies babies with types of immune deficiencies that are most likely to succeed with this approach and offers them transplant early in life before they get severe infections or later if their infections are under control. It includes only patients receiving unrelated or mismatched related donor transplants. The study will test if patients receiving transplant using either a low dose busulfan or a medium dose busulfan will have immune recovery of both T and B cells, measured by the ability to respond to immunizations after transplant. The exact regimen depends on the subtype of SCID the patient has. Donors used for transplant must be unrelated or half-matched related (haploidentical) donors, and peripheral blood stem cells must be used. To minimize the chance of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the stem cells will have most, but not all, of the T cells removed, using a newer, experimental approach of a well-established technology. Once the stem cell transplant is completed, patients will be followed for 3 years. Approximately 9-18 months after the transplant, vaccinations will be administered, and a blood test measuring whether your child's body has responded to the vaccine will be collected.
Hematologic, Pediatrics
II
Connelly, James
NCT03619551
VICCNCPED18122