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Testing the Ability to Decrease Chemotherapy in Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Who Have No Remaining Cancer at Surgery after Limited Pre-operative Chemotherapy and HER2-Targeted Therapy

Breast

This clinical trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab work in eliminating further chemotherapy after surgery in patients with HER2-positive stage II-IIIa breast cancer who have no cancer remaining at surgery (either in the breast or underarm lymph nodes) after pre-operative chemotherapy and HER2-targeted therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the bodys immune system. Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may enable fewer chemotherapy drugs to be given without compromising patient outcomes compared to the usual treatment.
Breast
II
Abramson, Vandana
NCT04266249
ECOGBREEA1181

Trastuzumab, Vinorelbine Tartrate, and Avelumab with or without Utomilumab in Treating Patients with HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

Breast

This phase II trial studies the how well trastuzumab, vinorelbine tartrate, and avelumab with or without utomilumab work in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vinorelbine tartrate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Utomilumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving trastuzumab, vinorelbine tartrate, and avelumab with or without utomilumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
Breast
II
Abramson, Vandana
NCT03414658
VICCBRE1893

Carboplatin with or without Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer with Locally Recurrent Chest Wall Disease That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Breast

This phase II trial studies the effect of carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) with chest wall disease that has come back (locally recurrent) and cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
Breast
II
Abramson, Vandana
NCT03095352
VICCBRE1808