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KaCrole Higgins was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2020. “In May 2020, I found a lump in my breast. I cried. By June, it was diagnosed as breast cancer, triple positive, stage 1A. While getting this cancer diagnosis was devastating, it also became an opportunity. Suddenly, the cancer gave me clarity. It gave me clarity about what was important, what was good in my life, what was toxic in my life, and what I needed to do.” Click below to read more of KaCrole’s story

https://momentum.vicc.org/2022/04/cancer-gave-me-clarity/

If Landon Ryan had been diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma 10, 20 or 30 years ago, she might not be here today with nearly perfect vision.Thanks to recent improvements in the treatment for this rare form of cancer that almost exclusively affects children under the age of 5, the diagnosis had the power to change Landon’s life when she was 11 months old, but not to take it — or her eyesight. Click below to learn more about Landon and her story.

https://momentum.vicc.org/2022/04/brighter-outlook/
Displaying 1 - 10 of 301

Testing the Addition of Nivolumab to Standard Treatment for Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer that have a BRAF Mutation

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II trial tests whether adding nivolumab to the usual treatment (encorafenib and cetuximab) works better than the usual treatment alone to shrink tumors in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and whose tumor has a mutation in a gene called BRAF. Encorafenib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It is used in patients whose cancer has a certain mutation (change) in the BRAF gene. It works by blocking the action of mutated BRAF that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps to stop or slow the spread of cancer cells. Cetuximab is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It binds to a protein called EGFR, which is found on some types of cancer cells. This may help keep cancer cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab in combination with encorafenib and cetuximab may be more effective than encorafenib and cetuximab alone at stopping tumor growth and spreading in patients with metastatic or unresectable BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer.
Colon, Rectal
II
Eng, Cathy
NCT05308446
SWOGGIS2107

Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Etoposide, Carboplatin or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients with Germ Cell Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors for recurrence after their tumor is removed. When the germ cell tumors has spread outside of the organ in which it developed, it is considered metastatic. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The trial studies whether carboplatin or cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy to use in treating metastatic standard risk germ cell tumors.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Gynecologic, Ovarian
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT03067181
COGAGCT1531

Pembrolizumab versus Observation in Patients with Early Stage Triple-Negative Breast Cancer who had a Pathologic Complete Response after Chemotherapy plus Pembrolizumab, OptimICE-PCR Trial

Breast

This phase III trial compares the effect of continuation of treatment with pembrolizumab (usual approach) to observation only at preventing cancer from coming back in patients with early-stage triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who achieved a pathologic complete response after preoperative chemotherapy in combination with pembrolizumab. The usual approach for patients with early-stage TNBC who receive preoperative chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab is to continue to receive pembrolizumab for up to 27 weeks after surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial may help researchers determine if observation is as good as receiving pembrolizumab for 27 weeks after surgery in triple-negative breast cancer patients who achieved a pathologic complete response after preoperative treatment with chemotherapy and pembrolizumab.
Breast
III
Abramson, Vandana
NCT05812807
VICC-NTBRE23357

Two Studies for Patients with Unfavorable Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer Testing Less Intense Treatment for Patients with a Low Gene Risk Score and Testing a More Intense Treatment for Patients with a Higher Gene Risk Score, The Guidance Trial

Prostate

This phase III trial uses the Decipher risk score to guide therapy selection. Decipher score is based on the activity of 22 genes in prostate tumor and may predict how likely it is for recurrent prostate cancer to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Decipher score in this study is used for patient selection and the two variations of treatment to be studied: intensification for higher Decipher score or de-intensification for low Decipher score. Patients with higher Decipher risk score will be assigned to the part of the study that compares the use of 6 months of the usual treatment (hormone therapy and radiation treatment) to the use of darolutamide plus the usual treatment (intensification). The purpose of this section of the study is to determine whether the additional drug can reduce the chance of cancer coming back and spreading in patients with higher Decipher score. The addition of darolutamide to the usual treatment may better control the cancer and prevent it from spreading. Alternatively, patients with low Decipher risk score will be assigned to the part of the study that compares the use of radiation treatment alone (de-intensification) to the usual approach (6 months of hormone therapy plus radiation). The purpose of this part of the study is to determine if radiation treatment alone is as effective compared to the usual treatment without affecting the chance of tumor coming back in patients with low Decipher score prostate cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy to kill tumor cells and reduce the tumor size. Hormone therapy drugs such as darolutamide suppress or block the production or action of male hormones that play role in prostate cancer development. Effect of radiation treatment alone in patients with low Decipher score prostate cancer could be the same as the usual approach in stabilizing prostate cancer and preventing it from spreading, while avoiding the side effects associated with hormonal therapy.
Prostate
III
Kirschner, Austin
NCT05050084
VICC-NTURO23322

Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

Germ Cell (Pediatrics)

This phase III trial compares the effect of an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or accelerated schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors compared to the standard schedule.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics)
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT02582697
COGAGCT1532

Evaluating the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Atezolizumab to Standard Chemotherapy Treatment for Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Carcinomas That Originate Outside the Lung

Neuroendocrine

This phase II/III trial compares the effect of immunotherapy with atezolizumab in combination with standard chemotherapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide versus standard therapy alone for the treatment of poorly differentiated extrapulmonary (originated outside the lung) neuroendocrine cancer that may have spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) or that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic). The other aim of this trial is to compare using atezolizumab just at the beginning of treatment versus continuing it beyond the initial treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cisplatin and carboplatin are in a class of medications known as platinum-containing compounds that work by killing, stopping or slowing the growth of cancer cells. Etoposide is in a class of medications known as podophyllotoxin derivatives. It blocks a certain enzyme needed for cell division and DNA repair, and it may kill cancer cells. Giving atezolizumab in combination with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide may work better in treating patients with poorly differentiated extrapulmonary neuroendocrine cancer compared to standard therapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide alone.
Neuroendocrine
II/III
Ramirez, Robert
NCT05058651
SWOGGIS2012

ILND Surgery Alone or after Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Penile Cancer

Miscellaneous

This phase III trial studies how well inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND) surgery alone or after chemotherapy with or without intensity-modulated radiation therapy works in treating patients with penile cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Surgery is used to remove the lymph nodes and may be able to cure the cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether having surgery after chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is better than having surgery alone.
Miscellaneous
III
Rini, Brian
NCT02305654
ECOGUROEA8134

Study of INBRX-109 in Conventional Chondrosarcoma

Sarcoma

Randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, Phase 2 study of INBRX-109 in unresectable or
metastatic conventional chondrosarcoma patients.
Sarcoma
II
Davis, Elizabeth
NCT04950075
VICCSAR2165

Comparing an Alternative Surgical Procedure, Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN) Biopsy, with Standard Neck Dissection for Patients with Early-Stage Oral Cavity Cancer

Head/Neck

This phase II/III trial studies how well sentinel lymph node biopsy works and compares sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery to standard neck dissection as part of the treatment for early-stage oral cavity cancer. Sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery is a procedure that removes a smaller number of lymph nodes from your neck because it uses an imaging agent to see which lymph nodes are most likely to have cancer. Standard neck dissection, such as elective neck dissection, removes many of the lymph nodes in your neck. Using sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery may work better in treating patients with early-stage oral cavity cancer compared to standard elective neck dissection.
Head/Neck
II/III
Topf, Michael
NCT04333537
NRGHN006

Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase IV trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system embryonal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
IV
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT02875314
VICCPED1751